The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

Think about who’s in jail and why. 

(via amerikkkan-stories)

and that “crime” could be anything they felt like charging you with

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

This was how the myth of Black criminality started, for the record. After the abolition of slavery, a lot of states made laws targeting Black people specifically, and then put them on chain gangs to get free labor from them.

Oh, and the US is still disproportionately incarcerating Black people and private prisons are making huge amounts off them.

(via bunnybotbaby)

(via slacktating)

‎People wonder why women don’t “fight back,” but they don’t wonder about it when women back down in arguments, are interrupted, purposefully lower and modulate their voices to express less emotion, […] They don’t wonder about all those daily social interactions in which women are quieter, ignored, or invisible, because those social interactions seem normal. Harriet J (via ceasesilence)

(via slacktating)

Mental disorders kind of really suck.

So does mental illness, but I’m going somewhere with this.

There are a great amount of categorized mental disorders, which contain a certain criteria for each of them. That’s how you diagnose someone with a mental disorder, basically.

But what happens if your symptoms fit more than one disorder, in the same amount? You can be labeled with more than one disorder.

For instance, I apparently have PTSD, Gen. Anxiety Disorder, and Bipolar Disorder. I fit the criteria for them completely at the same time. (well…BD is very debatable and I am being re-evaluated soon, but I digress.)

How does that work? You basically have to carry around several different burdens at once.

How, in every case, in every person, can you label them with a certain disorder, or certain disorders, perfectly? As it’s been proven, a person’s ‘disorder’ can actually change, and they end up diagnosed with a different one later on. I’m starting to exhibit signs of Borderline Personality Disorder now.

Maybe it’s all necessary for the proper treatment plans, but sometimes people are not just a defined disorder. Sometimes people are just ‘mentally ill,’ although I hate that. It sounds so harsh. So demeaning.

Maybe I’m a mish-mash of all of those disorders, but it’s a mouthful to say, and hard to think about. I’m a Bipolar, Post-Traumatic Stressed, Anxious person. Or maybe I’m just ‘mentally ill’ or ‘mentally unstable’ (a bit better of a term) in my own way that doesn’t have a definition from the DSM.

Everyone is unique. Disorders make us sound so uniform.

iwillbeatbpd:

Fuck yeah to the kids who feel like they’re dying inside but still gather up the strength to roll out of bed, get dressed, and leave the house. You are strong and beautiful and worth so much more than you know. 

(via slacktating)

forevergrilo:

niledork:

wholetyouinhere:

cozynoon:

Never forget that you are the protagonist of your own story

and the antagonist of someone else’s!

And a possible love interest in some other peoples! 0u0

This might just be the single most inspiration thing I have ever seen on the internet.

(via slacktating)

For each person there is a sentence—a series of words—which has the power to destroy them. — Philip K. Dick (via fawun)

(via slacktating)

sp00kyoctoberween:

IF I SEE “CONSENT IS SEXY” ONE MORE TIME I AM GOING TO SCREAM. CONSENT IS NOT SEXY, CONSENT IS FUCKING MANDATORY. STOP TRYING TO MARKET THIS IN A WAY THAT DOESN’T DISPLAY HOW FUCKING MANDATORY IT IS TO HAVE CONSENT. IT IS NOT A PLUS. A PERK. A THING THAT DESERVES A COOKIE. IT. IS. FUCKING. MANDATORY.

(via slacktating)

tomithejellyfish:

people with mental illnesses who joke about having mental illnesses in order to cope with said mental illnesses ARE NOT ROMANTICIZING MENTAL ILLNESSES

(via slacktating)

daolian:

don’t be too clingy
don’t be such a ‘girl’
be a woman
but be hairless like a child

don’t wear skimpy outfits
don’t be such a ‘slut’
be modest
but take it off when i ask

don’t assert yourself
don’t be such a ‘bi*ch’
be nice to me
but don’t be a f*cking doormat

don’t be ignorant
don’t be such a ‘bimbo’
be intelligent
but don’t argue your opinion with me

don’t wear make-up ever
don’t be so ‘insecure’
be yourself
but don’t complain if i don’t like it

(via slacktating)

It’s okay not to be thankful. — For those of you spending Thanksgiving with your abusers: it doesn’t matter what they tell you, it’s okay to feel bad. (via goldenphoenixgirl)

(via slacktating)